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Tuesday, May 12, 2020 | History

2 edition of Territorial behaviour in the ovenbird (Seiurus aurocapillus) with special reference to the role of food in the extent of the territory. found in the catalog.

Territorial behaviour in the ovenbird (Seiurus aurocapillus) with special reference to the role of food in the extent of the territory.

Judith Stenger

Territorial behaviour in the ovenbird (Seiurus aurocapillus) with special reference to the role of food in the extent of the territory.

by Judith Stenger

  • 270 Want to read
  • 27 Currently reading

Published .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Thesis (M.A.) -- University of Toronto, 1957.

The Physical Object
Pagination1 v.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL19744495M

This territorial behavior is typically quite stereotyped, and can usually be elicited experimentally with the use of recorded songs or with stuffed taxidermy mounts. Territory size varies enormously from species to species, and even within species, from individual to individual. A close relationship between territorial behavior and population regulation in birds was claimed by Howard () in his classic essay on territoriality and has been emphasized by both earlier and more recent authors (see Wynne-Edwards, ).File Size: 2MB.

  Another behaviour she documented was the “premeditated divorce” practices of female blue-headed vireos. In her book, “Bird Detective,” Stutchbury notes that both male and female birds.   Training or desensitizing and counter-conditioning (CC&D) is a wide spread behavior modification technique, whose ultimate goal is to change the emotional response (which leads to an overall change in the dog’s approach to the subject) towards a .

"The Behavior of Love gripped me from its opening pages and never let go. As compelling, psychologically complex and unpredictable as a real-life love affair, this book is also a profound statement on the limits of rationality and our societal institutions. Virginia Reeves made waves with her first novel, and rightfully so. This one is even Released on: Wild birds need the best possible territory for feeding, mating, and raising young, and they claim that territory in a variety of ways. This type of bird behavior can be valuable for birders to understand because knowing how birds claim territory will help birders understand the great lengths birds go to to raise their families.


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Territorial behaviour in the ovenbird (Seiurus aurocapillus) with special reference to the role of food in the extent of the territory by Judith Stenger Download PDF EPUB FB2

General. Ovenbird: Medium-sized, ground walking warbler with olive-brown upperparts and heavily spotted white underparts. Head has a dull orange central crown stripe, bold white eye-ring, and black eyebrows.

Wings and tail are olive-green. Legs are pink, stout, and long. Sexes are similar. Juvenile is duller and has olive-brown crown stripe. When food levels become high intruder pressure increases, and both sunbirds (Nectariniidae) and squirrels (Sciuridae) give up their territories, because the defence costs become too great.

At the other extreme, foraging productivity may become so low that, even with territorial defence, the animal is unable to meet its daily energy requirements.

Behavior Ovenbirds spend much of their time foraging on the ground, often walking with a herky-jerky, wandering stroll that is unlike most terrestrial songbirds.

Territorial males are very vocal and often sing from tree branches, occasionally quite high up. The Ovenbird is a member of the Order Passeriformes, which includes the perching birds. It is in Family Parulidae, which consists of the New World wood warblers.

The Ovenbird is in the Genus Seiurus, which also includes the Northern Waterthrush and Louisiana Waterthrush. Look for The ovenbird is a warbler that looks like a small speckled thrush.

A good look at the ovenbird’s head will help you differentiate it from larger thrushes and same-sized waterthrushes. The wide, white eye ring is the first clue.

The waterthrushes lack this, having instead a white stripe (supercilium) running from above the eye to the back of the head. Many of the animal and bird species are very territorial. At the Breeding time, they get more sensitive towards safeguarding their territory.

Animals engage in aggressive fights to dominate their territory. Territory fights between different species could be different. Territorial behaviour, in zoology, the methods by which an animal, or group of animals, protects its territory from incursions by others of its species.

Territorial boundaries may be marked by sounds such as bird song, or scents such as pheromones secreted by the skin glands of many mammals. If such advertisement does not discourage intruders, chases and fighting follow. Territorial behaviour, in zoology, the methods by which an animal, or group of animals, protects its territory from incursions by others of its species.

Following, this definition, yes territorial behaviour exists in humans. Here are three simple examples drawn from different (western) cultures. Territorial behaviour Territorial animals sometimes reduce the size of their defended area or even abandon it altogether.

For example, during the winter, pied wagtail s are often seen to switch between defending and sharing their feeding territories along riverbanks. Songs. The primary mating and territorial song of the male Ovenbird is a rapid, resounding tea-cher, Tea-cher, TEA-cher growing louder over the first few repetitions, with 8 to 13 teacher phrases in all.

Pitch, speed, and emphasis of syllables in the –4 second song vary among individuals. A Territorial Antelope: The Uganda Waterbuck discusses anatomical, physiological, and behavioral organization from birth to death of waterbuck. Comprised of 12 chapters, the book focuses on the function and cause of the waterbuck’s territorial behavior.

After an introduction to the classification, distribution, and origins of waterbuck, the book discusses the topography, geology, vegetation, fauna, and. Duetting is a collective behavior and might have multiple functions, including joint territory defense and mate guarding.

An important step toward understanding the adaptive function of bird song is to determine if and how singing behavior varies by: 4. Territorial behavior is a primary form of aggressive spacing behavior that has intrigued naturalists since Aristotle. H.E. Howard's 70rritory in Bird Lij9 () formally intro- duced scientific inquiry into the subject.

Research on arian territori- ality has now established three ma}or aspects of territorial behavior: Size: KB. The behavioral assessment will determine the function and triggers of the dog’s aggressive behavior and whether or not it is, in fact, territorial.

Territorial aggression often starts with threats Author: AKC Staff. Becker () studied territorial behaviour in a library. The strongest sign of territoriality was the physical presence of a person at a table: newcomers tended not to select tables at which someone was already sitting.

However, they also tended to avoid tables where someone else had left personal possessions (books, clothing etc.). These itemsFile Size: 65KB.

Why does the Ovenbird sing in sudden bursts after nightfall. A: During spring and early summer, male ovenbirds frequently sing at night, sometimes while flying over the woodland canopy.

This courtship/territorial behavior is common during the breeding season, when. Twenty-five years after it first caused a splash in the scientific and literary worlds, Intimate Behavior is still one of the best chronicles of human intimacy.

With a masterful and entertaining eye, Desmond Morris, bestselling author of The Naked Ape and The Human Zoo, analyzes the roots of human intimacy, from the handshake through the twelve stages that people pass through on their way to /5(13).

Territorial behaviour is an important part of the lives of many animals. Once a territory has been acquired, an animal may spend its entire life on it, and may have to repeatedly defend it from Author: Judy Stamps.

The Territorial Imperative: A Personal Inquiry Into the Animal Origins of Property and Nations is a nonfiction book by American writer Robert describes the evolutionarily determined instinct among humans toward territoriality and the implications of this territoriality in human meta-phenomena such as property ownership and nation : Robert Ardrey.

The Rufous Hornero is a duetting, year-round territorial and socially monogamous Neotropical bird. Previous observational and experimental data suggest that duetting in this species is cooperative. V.

Development of Territorial Behavior Territoriality involves complex behavioral patterns used repeatedly in interaction and communication, which emerge in play early in life. In one study, the complex underwater vocal displays of territorial male bearded seals appeared at 4–5 years of age in several captive males, but not in females.Books at Amazon.

The Books homepage helps you explore Earth's Biggest Bookstore without ever leaving the comfort of your couch. Here you'll find current best sellers in books, new releases in books, deals in books, Kindle eBooks, Audible audiobooks, and so much more.Any objects such as windows and glass doors and auto mirrors which reflect the bird’s image give the territorial bird the impression that there is another bird in their territory.

And since it is usually the male that establishes and defends territories, other males are the greatest threat, and, of course, a male sees another male in the window or mirror.